Relaxation month

In this sixth month of my values challenge, I’m going to focus on learning how to relax and enjoy my life more. If you’ve missed them, I’ve already worked on happiness, honesty, self-improvement, humility and getting better relationships so far this year. I’m trying to make myself a better person.
I know this will be a good month for me to focus on, as I have been guilty in the past of pushing myself too hard to the detriment of my family. When I get started on a project, it tends to take over my life to an unhealthy degree and I choose to spend all my free time working rather than relaxing.

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August 2014 (Review)

As part of my commitment to honesty, I’m writing a series of posts to monitor and share progress as I try to live up to my life values and meet my monthly goals. I’m still learning about self-analysis, so expect these reviews to change over time. I hope you’ll find them interesting and they’ll be a useful guide for to look back at.

At the start of the month, I set out three types of goal:

  1. Journey goals
  2. Value goals
  3. Other goals

I then review my progress against these goals at the end of the month.

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Wuthering Heights (review)

Wuthering HeightsI first read Wuthering Heights when I was around sixteen, because it was part of the reading list at school. I remember being surprised that I enjoyed it, and looking back over my copy I made plenty of notes. They don’t all make sense now, but it seems that the novel has something to do with society and windows. If I could come up with that over a decade ago, I was interested to see how I’d react this time.

As soon as I finished the novel, with its brilliant and famous ending in my mind, I knew I felt the same as I had in school. The story is so powerful that you can’t walk away without at least a pause for thought. Heathcliff is one of the best characters of all time, he’s dark, passionate and mysterious. Not only every teen girl’s dream, but a fantastic character to read as an adult.

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Relationships month

In this fifth month of my values challenge, I’m going to focus on building better relationships. If you’ve missed them, I’ve already worked on happiness, honesty, self-improvement and humility so far this year. I’m trying to make myself a better person.

I’m excited to start this one, I often worry about my relationships with friends and family and think I can do a better job with them. Although it’s likely to be my biggest challenge, it may have the greatest rewards.

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July 2014 (Review)

As part of my commitment to honesty, I’m writing a series of posts to monitor and share progress as I try to live up to my life values and meet my monthly goals. I’m still learning about self-analysis, so expect these reviews to change over time. I hope you’ll find them interesting and they’ll be a useful guide for to look back at.

At the start of the month, I set out three types of goal:

  1. Journey goals
  2. Value goals
  3. Other goals

I then review my progress against these goals at the end of the month.

Here’s how I got on this month:
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The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Review)

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

The Murder of Roger Ackroyd

As a Poirot and Agatha Christie fan, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd is the first novel on my list that I have read before. Probably more than twice. And seen the TV adaption. Despite my familiarity with the story, and its famous twist, it was the most engrossing book I’ve read so far. The mystery works just as well if you know the secrets or don’t.

Christie knows how to tell a story. Her books are more consumed than read, pages and chapters fly past before you realise how late it is. Alongside this, she plots a scientific murder case for Poirot to unravel. The result is a masterclass in detective fiction – enough adventure, mystery and surprise.

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Emma (Review)

EmmaThe third of my Library Perfect reviews took me to my oldest (and thickest) novel yet. Jane Austen’s Emma is a book I’ve never felt compelled to attempt, nor any of her work. Other than reading Wuthering Heights at school, I have little knowledge of women writers from the 1800’s.
Probably due to my ignorance and preference for modern novels, I found the opening of Emma hard. Even after a few chapters, I wasn’t attuned to the manner of Austen’s writing or engaged with the society she describes. I knew then Emma would take some time to complete. Without the benefit of a holiday, I might still be reading it.

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